Archive for the ‘racism’ Tag

Arrests at anti-Islamic protest

Arrests at anti-Islamic protest

Police in Birmingham have arrested 33 people during a demonstration against Islamic fundamentalism and counter-protest by anti-fascists.

The demonstration – by groups calling themselves the English and Welsh Defence League and Casuals United – was made up of football fans, said police.

The counter-protest was organised by campaign group Unite Against Fascism, West Midlands Police said.

Two people were injured in the disturbances in the city centre.

Police said there were “sporadic incidents of disturbance in the city centre” with the majority of the arrests being for disorder.

There was one report of criminal damage to a vehicle, but more were expected. No police officers were hurt.

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Terrorist Neil Lewington wanted to rid country of non-Brits

Terrorist Neil Lewington wanted to rid country of non-Brits

A Tilehurst terrorist saw himself as ‘pure white’ and wanted to exterminate the UK of those he considered non-British.

Neil Lewington, 44, has been warned he faces a lengthy jail term after being convicted of seven out of eight offences at the Old Bailey yesterday.

He denied all eight charges but the jury took less than two days to come back with a verdict on charges including intent to endanger life and preparing for acts of terrorism.

The unemployed White Supremacist, of Church End Lane, was arrested by chance at Lowestoft railway station on October 30 last year after drunkenly urinating on the platform.

Police were amazed when they stumbled across two homemade explosive devices in his holdall and directed a search of his home, where a plethora of bomb making materials and neo-Nazi propaganda, including a handwritten Waffen SS UK members’ handbook, was found.

Lewington drunkenly told police on his arrest he was ‘Mr Bin Laden’ on his way for a ‘pyrotechnic weekend’ with his girlfriend who he had met on an internet chat room called Hot or Not.

The neo-Nazi ‘asylum seekers’

The neo-Nazi ‘asylum seekers’

They looked like a pair of cranks straight out of a Louis Theroux documentary.

One was an unrepentant woman hater whose racist and anti-Semitic views were too hard-line even for the British National Party.

The other, his long-haired sidekick, sought the protection of a pseudonym that he used to make extremist rants.

Their hunger to stir up controversy saw them flee from justice in the north of England and stage an unlikely claim for political asylum in Los Angeles.

But their journey has now ended with jail sentences in the UK.

Jurors at Leeds Crown Court decided neo-Nazis Simon Sheppard and Stephen Whittle were not just harmless oddballs, but dangerous propagandists dedicated to whipping up racism.

On Friday, Sheppard was jailed for four years, 10 months and Whittle for two years, four months.

In a landmark case, they have become the first Britons to be convicted of inciting racial hatred online, having printed leaflets and controlled websites featuring racist material.

Police fear far-right terror attack

Police fear far-right terror attack

Scotland Yard’s counter-terrorism command fears that right-wing extremists will stage a deadly terrorist attack in Britain to try to stoke racial tensions, the Guardian has learned.

Senior officers say it will be a “spectacular” that is designed to kill. The counter-terrorism unit has redeployed officers to increase its monitoring of the extreme right’s potential to stage attacks.

Commander Shaun Sawyer told a meeting of British Muslims concerned about the danger to their communities that police were responding to the growing threat.

Sawyer said of the far right: “I fear that they will have a spectacular… they will carry out an attack that will lead to a loss of life or injury to a community somewhere. They’re not choosy about which community.”

He said the aim would be to cause a “breakdown in community cohesion”.

Sawyer revealed that the Met commissioner, Sir Paul Stephenson, had asked the counter-terrorism command, SO15, to examine what the economic downturn would mean for far-right violence. The assessment concluded that the recession would increase the possibility of it.

Tilehurst man planned to attack ‘non-British’ people using shrapnel bombs, Old Bailey hears

Tilehurst man planned to attack ‘non-British’ people using shrapnel bombs, Old Bailey hears

A NEO-Nazi from Tilehurst planned to unleash havoc against “non-British” people using shrapnel bombs, a jury heard today(Monday.)
Forty-three-year-old Neil Christopher Lewington had a bomb factory in the bedroom of the home he shared with his parents in Church End Lane, the Old Bailey jury in London was told.
Brian Altman QC, prosecuting, said officers found explosive chemicals and racist manuals including the Waffen SS UK Members’ Handbook and instructions on constructing devices.
His cache of hate literature and chemicals was discovered after Lewington was arrested for drunkenly abusing a female rail employee at Lowestoft train station in Suffolk on October 30 last year, it is claimed.
An RAF bomb disposal expert examined the contents of his holdall which included plastic bags, each containing a digital clock with three batteries glued to the back.
Another plastic bag contained a large box of firelighters attached to modified filament igniters and booster tubes containing match head and firework powder.
Later searches of Mr Lewington’s home revealed the Waffen SS handbook which contained drawings of electronics and chemical mixtures, jurors were told.
Mr Altman added: “In addition to all of that, the police discovered evidence that the defendant sympathised with and quite clearly adhered to white supremacist and racist views.
“The effect of these finds is to prove that this man, who had strong if not fanatical right-wing leanings and opinions, was on the cusp of embarking on a campaign of terrorism against those he considered non-British.”

Ex-Skinhead Leyden on Supremacist Motivation, Threat

Ex-Skinhead Leyden on Supremacist Motivation, Threat

TJ Leyden, 43, spent 15 years as a leader in the white supremacist movement. He covered his body with Nazi tattoos and advocated violence against Jews and other minorities. And then the scales fell from his eyes, and Leyden realized he’d been living a lie and dragging others into it.

Since his transformation more than a decade ago, Leyden, who grew up in Fontana and wreaked havoc in Los Angeles, has promoted not hatred but tolerance. He wrote a book, “Skinhead Confessions” (Cedar Fort Inc., 2008), and worked at the Museum of Tolerance in West L.A. until moving last year to southern Utah, where he hopes to open a ranch for troubled youth. In the wake of last week’s fatal shooting of a museum guard by James von Brunn, an 88-year-old U.S. Navy veteran, at the United States Museum of the Holocaust, Leyden talked to The Journal about the thinking behind such actions.

Jewish Journal: How do white supremacists see the world?
TJ Leyden: It’s pretty much black and white. The white race and everybody else. Jewish people technically are white; Asians have light skin. But they say they technically are not white because of features and religion.

JJ: Why is there so much overlap between white supremacists, neo-Nazis and conspiracy theorists?
TL: If people start to buy them and believe them, conspiracies are a good recruitment school. The government was behind Sept. 11 and all this other stuff. Who’s really in control, and who really planned this whole thing was the government, who is controlled by Israel. And the person will say, ‘Wow, you know even more than most people.’

Burnopfield terror suspect had stash of deadly poison

Burnopfield terror suspect had stash of deadly poison

A SUSPECTED white supremacist appeared in court yesterday accused of holding a stash of the deadly poison ricin.

Ian Davison, 41, was brought before City of Westminster Magistrates’ Court, in central London, to face three terrorist charges.

The former pub DJ was arrested with his son Nicky, 18, on June 2, by counter-terrorism detectives investigating an international group of white supremacists.

The court heard they claim to have found a quantity of ricin at his home in Myrtle Grove, Burnopfield, County Durham. Prosecutor Stuart Laidlaw said the same charge alleges Davison attempted to publish manuals about firearms and explosives on the internet to incite others to commit terrorism.

He said Davison faces a further two terrorist charges of possessing information likely to be useful to a terrorist and a fourth charge of possessing ricin contrary to the Chemical Weapons Act.

White supremacist gunman James W. von Brunn had links to BNP

White supremacist gunman James W. von Brunn had links to BNP

The white supremacist gunman who shot dead a guard at the Holocaust museum in Washington D.C. had attended meetings of the American Friends of the British National Party, it emerged today.

James W. von Brunn, an avowed anti-Semite, burst into the museum in the American capital and fired a rifle, killing Stephen Tyrone Johns, a security guard.

Todd Blodgett, a former White House aide who worked as an informant within white supremacist groups, said today that Mr von Brunn and his friend John de Nugent had attended meetings in Arlington County, Virginia, of the American Friends of the BNP. The organisation was set up to raise funds for the BNP but has since been disbanded.

Mr de Nugent wrote on his blog: “I have twice met Nick Griffin, the dynamic chairman of the British National Party.”

He added that he had “the gravest misgivings” about Mr Griffin allowing Jewish people to join the BNP, but said: “My hat is off to this fighting white man, Nick Griffin, for the incredible victories for White Britain which his hard work, rhino-thick skin against Jewsmedia criticism, and inspired leadership have made possible. It is not easy to be a leader; it is lonely, as they say, at the top. Hail the white leader, Nick Griffin!”

Andrew Brons: the genteel face of neo-fascism

Andrew Brons: the genteel face of neo-fascism

It was on Hitler’s birthday, deliberately chosen, that the National Socialist Movement was formed in Britain in the 1960s. It was the first political organisation of the far right that Andrew Brons, the newly-elected British National party MEP for Yorkshire and Humberside, was to join – but not the last.

The group that he signed up to as a teenager had been founded in honour of Hitler by the British fascist leader, the late Colin Jordan. No mention of this early political involvement features on the BNP’s website celebrating Brons’s victory. Instead, Brons is portrayed just as a “veteran British Nationalist”.

Brons, 61, comes from what might be described as the genteel wing of British neo-fascism. He lists William Cobbett, the radical journalist and author of Rural Rides, as his favourite historical person, the Pickwick Papers as his favourite book and Zelig as his favourite film. But his early associations with the far right were when it was at its most overtly racist and before it had started to try to present itself as just another political party.

The group he first joined included among its members people responsible for arson attacks on Jewish property and synagogues. According to the anti-fascist organisation Searchlight, which has been tracking his career for decades, Brons appears to have approved. In a letter to Jordan’s wife, Brons reported meeting an NSM member who “mentioned such activities as bombing synagogues”, to which Brons responded that “on this subject I have a dual view, in that I realise that he is well intentioned, I feel that our public image may suffer considerable damage as a result of these activities. I am however open to correction on this point.”

Italy allows vigilantes for first time since Mussolini’s Blackshirts

Italy allows vigilantes for first time since Mussolini’s Blackshirts

A new law gives an official stamp of approval to vigilante groups that have sprung up in several Italian cities, especially in the northern strongholds of the Right-wing, anti-immigrant Northern League.

The vigilantes will be able to alert police to public order offences or suspected criminals but do not have the power of arrest.

One group, known as the Italian National Guard, claims to have 2,000 members. It plans to dress its members in khaki shirts, black ties and black armbands bearing a red symbol that critics say resembles a swastika.

The opposition Democratic Party warned that such groups set a dangerous precedent and harked back to Italy’s fascist past.

“There was a period in Italy’s history in which security was entrusted to people who went around in shirts of the same colour and we don’t want to return to that,” said Dario Franceschini, the party’s leader.

The accusation prompted an angry response from the government, which said that the vigilante patrols are a legitimate means of combating crime.