Archive for the ‘sweden’ Tag

Richard Stallman: How the Swedish Pirate Party Platform Backfires on Free Software

Richard Stallman: How the Swedish Pirate Party Platform Backfires on Free Software

The bullying of the copyright industry in Sweden inspired the launch of the first political party whose platform is to reduce copyright restrictions: the Pirate Party. Its platform includes the prohibition of Digital Restrictions Management, legalization of noncommercial sharing of published works, and shortening of copyright for commercial use to a five-year period. Five years after publication, any published work would go into the public domain.

I support these changes, in general; but the specific combination chosen by the Swedish Pirate Party backfires ironically in the special case of free software. I’m sure that they did not intend to hurt free software, but that’s what would happen.

The GNU General Public License and other copyleft licenses use copyright law to defend freedom for every user. The GPL permits everyone to publish modified works, but only under the same license. Redistribution of the unmodified work must also preserve the license. And all redistributors must give users access to the software’s source code.

How would the Swedish Pirate Party’s platform affect copylefted free software? After five years, its source code would go into the public domain, and proprietary software developers would be able to include it in their programs. But what about the reverse case?

Proprietary software is restricted by EULAs, not just by copyright, and the users don’t have the source code. Even if copyright permits noncommercial sharing, the EULA may forbid it. In addition, the users, not having the source code, do not control what the program does when they run it. To run such a program is to surrender your freedom and give the developer control over you.

Pirate Bay guilty

Pirate Bay guilty

The four men connected with The Pirate Bay were found guilty of being accessories to copyright infringement by a Swedish court on Friday, delivering a symbolic victory in the entertainment industry’s efforts to put a stop to the sharing of copyrighted material on the internet.

The four defendants in the case, Fredrik Neij, Gottfrid Svartholm Warg, Peter Sunde and Carl Lundström, were each sentenced to one year in prison and ordered to pay 30 million kronor ($3.56 million) in damages.

The trial attracted wide international attention, with file sharers and copyright holders around the world wondering what sort or precedent may be set by the Stockholm court as it assessed arguments by the entertainment industry that the four men behind The Pirate Bay had been accessories to copyright infringement.

The Stockholm District Court printed up 250 copies of the judgment to meet the expected interest from media outlets.

“By providing a website with … well-developed search functions, easy uploading and storage possibilities, and with a tracker linked to the website, the accused have incited the crimes that the filesharers have committed,” the court said in a statement to the media.

Solidarity protest:

Sweden : Nazis tried to murder union organizer & their child

Sweden : Nazis tried to murder union organizer & their child

In 1999 nazis murdered the syndicalist Björn Söderberg, now they tried it again. Two syndicalists from stockholm – one of them ex boardmembers in the stockholm LS union – and their 3 year old daughter was forced to climb out of their balcony on the third floor from their aparatement as nazis put fire to their home.

The union members had before the attack been threathened by the nazi website Info-14. The Nazis behind Info-14 is the same people that arranges the yearly Nazimarch in Salem.

Around 2100 monday 1 of december our members heard a splashing sound from the hallway.

I saw someone pouring a clear liquid through the mailbox opening in the door and understood by the smell that it was gasoline. I screamed so loud that I am sure they heard it that we have children in here, only seconds later someone ignited the gasoline

In the Hallway the familys winter clothings were hanging, and it took only seconds before the fire spread out of control and into the kitchen and living room. To get out through the main door was impossible now.

We managed to lower our daughter down unto our neighbours balcony below, we live on the third floor and had we dropped her she would have died.

The couple climbed afterward down the same way. behind them the fire was out fo control burning their personal belongings, memories and future plans.

Our members and their daughter came from it without being wounded, but it does not change the fact that someone coldbloodied executed a plan to take their lives.

Six months ago, the Nazi website Info-14 publicated names and pictures of our members.

The police work out of the theory that the murder attempt was politically motivated, and executed by the same people that tw odays earlier burned down the open socialist culture (Community) center Cyclopen in Högdalen. The charge the police has is arson and attempt of murder with fire.

Our members have through their union worked for antiracism and removal of class differences, for this the Nazis decided to sentence them to death.

Sweden: Building occupied in pay dispute

Building occupied in pay dispute

Several construction workers barricaded themselves in a building in the Gärdet district of Stockholm late Friday night vowing not to leave the site until they get paid.

They welded several doors shut and dragged containers in front of the building, which they had been in the process of renovating.

The head of the small construction company which is hunkered down in the building told the TT news agency that a large customer has refused to pay.

“For us this is a lot of money, but for the project, which is worth a half a billion kronor ($63 million), it’s not so much,” he said.

If the debts aren’t paid soon, the company will go bankrupt, according to the man.

He has turned to debt collectors to settle the issue, but time is running out.

On Thursday, desperation took the upper hand.

The company boss is aware of the risks that come with the protest action.

“I’ve been thinking about this over and over all day long. No matter which way I turn, I’m going to run into problems with some authority in Sweden. If I don’t get the money, I’ll go bankrupt, and people won’t get paid.,” he said.

“I decided last night that I’m just going to go all the way and suffer the consequences.”